KAMPANJ

Poster: éternel féminin

Konstnär: Piet Flour

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Mars träram
Svart träram av högsta kvalitet. Svensktillverkad ram med äkta glas. Listens bredd: 25 mm, listens djup: 15 mm.

Accent aluminiumram
Stilren aluminiumram i svart färg från Nielsen med äkta glas. Listens bredd: 8 mm, listens djup: 18 mm.

Elara träram
Exklusiv träram av ek med högsta kvalitet. Svensktillverkad ram med äkta glas. Listens bredd: 17 mm, listens djup: 22 mm.

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Kundtjänst: 018-18 68 28

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Bildens id: 378800

 

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POSTERMOTIV

Motiv: éternel féminin. Detail of the jewelry and dress code from the Himba women. The breasts are nonsexual, but the buttocks are always carefully covered. The Himba wear little clothing, but the women are famous for covering themselves with otjize, a mixture of butter fat and ochre, possibly to protect themselves from the sun. The mixture gives their skins a reddish tinge. This symbolizes earth's rich red color and the blood that symbolizes life, and is consistent with the Himba ideal of beauty. Women braid each other's hair and cover it except the ends, in their ochre mixture. Traditionally both men and women go topless and wear skirts or loincloths made of animal skins in various colors. Adult women wear beaded anklets. The hairstyle of the OvaHimba indicates age and social status. Children have two plaits of braided hair. From the onset of puberty the girls' plaits are moved to the face over their eyes, and they can have more than two. Married women wear headdresses with many streams of braided hair, coloured and put in shape with otjize. Single men wear one plait backwards to their necks, while married men wear a turban of many otjize-soaked plaits.